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indigen 04-15-2011 09:27 PM

[QUOTE=Daniel the Great;95995]The Albanians are big criminals, they are drug dealers, that is where there money comes from, it is not honest work that got them those mansions.[/QUOTE]

It is good to read (see) that there are still some Macedonians able to use their brains (logic and rationale) when analysing Macedonian issues! But I would also not make blanket generalisations about anyone, including the Ghegs.

NB: There were some good articles from around 2001 - 2004 covering this issue and may be found on Antiwar.com or in articles by Chris Deliso. The "Albanian Mafia" is VERY BIG in Europe and they must launder their money somehow, which means Macedonia (amongst other places) is a good money laundering factory.

-----------------
[B]
On the Front Lines in Tetovo[/B]
by Christopher Deliso
January 25, 2002

Skopje, Macedonia – For the past year, the Albanians in Macedonia have claimed that repression, economic inequality, and a general lack of rights have justified starting a war. Tetovo, a town in the sparsely-populated west of Macedonia, where more than 60% of the population is Albanian, would seem an ideal place to test this assumption. Visiting Tetovo, however, one discovers a completely different reality. The rapidly increasing prosperity of the Albanians there is witnessed by the large car dealerships, hotels, bars, and retail stores lining the downtown and the entrance road from Skopje. Many of these are still under construction, grand skeletons of what will become essentially a reborn city. All throughout Tetovo, new houses and newly-laid foundations dominate. They are almost entirely Albanian.

In marked contrast to the Albanians, the Macedonian minority in Tetovo lives in either drab, Yugoslav-era high-rise apartments, or else in dilapidated old houses in Tetovo's "old town." This section of town is located on the base and side of the Sar Planina mountain. Tetovo was effectively cleared of some 20,000 Macedonians at the height of the fighting. Of the 6,000 people who have not yet returned, most lived here. The Macedonian houses once spread up the mountainside, but are now pillaged and destroyed. The NLA hid inside them when firing down on the Macedonian army, thus ensuring that the latter would have to shoot at their own property.
Funding the trend

The wave of Albanian building projects in Tetovo and environs boils down to one factor: money. Lavish new houses are being built in record numbers by wealthy expatriate Albanians from Switzerland, Germany, the US and other countries. [COLOR="Red"]These activities are mirrored by a quite visible growth of businesses such as hotels, bars, and car dealerships – some of which are no doubt funded by Albanian mafia bosses from Kosovo and Macedonia.[/COLOR]

[B][COLOR="Red"]All throughout the west of Macedonia, and especially in Tetovo, the increased construction of luxurious homes and businesses by Albanians has gone on simultaneously with the forced expulsion of Macedonians from the region. Several villages in the desolate stretches of Sar Planina, that were part or all Macedonian a year ago, are now entirely Albanian. Strongholds like Sipkovica, for example, feature almost palatial Albanian mansions. Consequently, one should be skeptical of those who insist that this war was not fought for the consolidation of territory.[/COLOR][/B]

[B][COLOR="Red"]The relatively recent phenomenon of very wealthy Albanians (owing not a little to the rise of an all-powerful Albanian Mafia),[/COLOR][/B] coupled with the economic hardship of the past ten years in Macedonia, made the current situation almost inevitable. For poor Macedonians who are used to surviving on a typical salary of $150 a month, it is impossible to say no when offered up to $500,000 for their property. Faced with such an "offer they can't refuse," many Macedonians have already pocketed the money and moved out. One might argue that those Macedonians who claim to be so patriotic should do what it takes to remain in their ancestral lands. Money talks, however, and few are so patriotic as to turn down the chance to renew their own lives, either in Skopje or out of the country entirely. Surviving on the wages that the state and state-owned industry pays requires frugality at best. Yet for many Macedonians, this is the extent of their opportunities at present.

The supreme irony of all this is that the Albanians have been complaining that they can't get state jobs. As a factory supervisor explained, "these jobs aren't good enough for them. Why would they work for so little when they could have so much more money (smuggling drugs or weapons)?"

[...]

[url]http://www.antiwar.com/orig/deliso26.html[/url]

[B]
The Instability Myth, Free Markets and Macedonia's Future[/B]
by Christopher Deliso in Skopje
December 21, 2002
[url]http://www.antiwar.com/orig/deliso63.html[/url]

[B]
Europe's New Terror Profile and the State of Play in the Balkans[/B]
by Christopher Deliso August 8, 2005

balkanalysis.com
[url]http://anti-war.com/deliso/?articleid=6899[/url]


13 Feb 2002 - WMC-News - Show me the money, says Macedonia
[B]
SHOW ME THE MONEY, SAYS MACEDONIA[/B]
By: Christopher Deliso
[url]http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MakNed/message/596[/url]



[B]Interview with Pravda - Macedonia, Now and Then

Christopher Deliso Interviews Sam Vaknin, Ph.D.
Excerpted in Pravda on August 14, 2001[/B]


Q: What duties did you have as economic advisor? When was this post created? By whom?

A: The post was created in autumn 1999, immediately after the elections. Two outside consultants were hired: Mr. Ante Markovik, Yugoslavia's last Prime Minister, and myself. My job consisted of gathering economic data, analyzing it, proposing policy alternatives, drafting laws and international tender documents and reviewing decisions made by various economic Ministries. The post was created by the Prime Minister of Macedonia, Mr. Ljubco Georgievski and by the then Deputy Prime Minister, Mr. Vasil Tupurkovski. I left the position last month.

Q: How significantly did the forced influx of Kosovar Albanians from Spring '99 affect Macedonia economically?

A: Politically, Kosovo was and is a threat to Macedonia's very existence as a unitary, unified, sovereign, and autonomous homeland to the Macedonians (by the way, I am an Israeli, not a Macedonian). Economically, though, it was a mixed blessing. On the one hand the burden of accepting, harbouring, feeding, and accommodating c. 300,000 refugees (equal to 15% of the population) was crushing. Macedonia's infrastructure nearly collapsed under this sudden onslaught and due to the heavy use by NATO/KFOR. Macedonia was never fully compensated for these outlays. The West has honoured less than 25% (!) of pledges it made in donor conferences. Moreover, the imminent threat to the very social fabric of Macedonia caused Western firms (mainly Germans and American - less so Greek) to cancel manufacturing orders and sub-contracting of textile production. Agriculture has suffered badly due to the effective blockade imposed by NATO's siege of Kosovo, the devastation of the Danube bridges and the throngs of refugees. The wine and tobacco industries were virtually demolished. Still, NATO has spent hundreds of millions of DM's in Macedonia since 1999. An influx of 10,000 well-earning foreigners (mainly employed in more than 60 branches of NGO's established here) also offset some of the damage by revitalizing the services sector. And Macedonia was rewarded by being integrated into pan-European structures (e.g., its stabilization and association agreement with the EU) or southeast European ones (e.g. the Stability Pact).

Q: George Soros' organizations pumped a lot of money into Macedonia in the 90's. Some have alleged that this was a case of "Greeks bearing gifts" and that he was trying to buy the country's future policy direction. Is this a legitimate criticism?

A: No, it is not. Soros invested close to nothing here. He did encourage a series of modest cultural efforts and did provide free internet ISP services to NGOs, the media, and academic institutions but that was just about it. Perhaps Macedonia - with 3.5 billion US dollars in GDP - is simply too marginal and inconsequential...:o))

Q: Is Macedonia now in better or worse shape economically than it was in '99? Why?

A: In some ways it is better off, in others much worse off. The young and dynamic Minister of Finance of Macedonia, Mr. Nikola Gruevski, has succeeded to pass through parliaments dozens of modern economic laws, thus equipping Macedonia with an advanced economic legal infrastructure. The state sold or shut down most of the loss making industrial behemoths, thus considerably reducing budgetary strain. Foreign direct investment (mainly Greek, but also German and Slovenian) has qauntupled. Privatization made great (and highly controversial) strides. The local telecom was just sold to MATAV. Macedonia's biggest bank, Stopanska Bank, was sold to the Greek National Bank. At the beginning of the year, the introduction of VAT caused the budget to be in surplus and allowed the state to accelerate the repayment of its obligations to its citizens. GDP has increased by 5% and things looked rosy. The country was even contemplating obtaining a sovereign credit rating and issuing international bonds. The only blight was an ever growing trade deficit which may have been the outcome of an overvalued currency. But the eruption of the insurgency by the NLA has changed all this painfully. With the exception of some deals with the Greeks already in the pipeline, all FDI ceased. Trade collapsed by 20%. Industrial production plummeted by almost 9% (from an already dilapidated base). Manufacturing orders and production contracts were called off. Airlines cancelled their routes to Skopje. Most foreigners left the scene. The IMF did not renew the arrangement with Macedonia and the EU has suspended credit and aid facilities in an effort to exert pressure over Macedonian decision makers to show more transigence in the negotiations with the Albanians. The damage to the country's image as an investment destination is irreparable and irreversible. As taxes collected diminished and the need to finance what became a civil war became more pressing, the budget swung to deficit.

Q: Northern Macedonia, along with Kosovo, is the lawless European crossroads for drug, weapons and sex trafficking. Albanians have been largely linked with this. Are there only Albanian gangs, or are there also Macedonian ones? Is organized crime permitted in Macedonia (i.e., corrupt politicians)? And is suppressing the black market in Macedonia's best interest, anyway?

A: Drug trafficking is only one of a series of criminal economic activities typical of the region. Cigarette smuggling, white slavery, illegal immigration, cross border trading in light weapons, piracy of intellectual software and much more besides. Macedonian and Albanian gangs collaborate in these activities under the protection (and profit sharing) of corrupt politicians and officials in the kleptocracies that pass for governments in these countries. The informal economy is comprised of both criminal activities and tax evasion. I think that the informal sector is the most vibrant, entrepreneurial and employment-creating one in Macedonia and should be left to its own beneficial devices until the state sorts out its own act. In the absence of impartial and functioning institutions - courts, banks, tax administration, customs - Macedonia is blessed to have a black economy.

Q: It is well-known that the ethnic Albanian rebels in Macedonia are financed from abroad, particularly by groups in Switzerland and the U.S. Is there any evidence that advocacy groups, such as Joe DiGuardi's Albanian-American Civic League, are involved in this? And, is it known what percentage of their weapons-buying funds are garnered from criminal profits?

A: The NLA is not a monolithic entity. It is more like an umbrella organization with serious and fracturing differences of opinion regarding the ultimate goals the insurrection and the means to obtain these goals. Roughly, it is made up of one third veteran Kosovo fighters, some of them professional soldiers, who also fought in Croatia, or in the Foreign Legion. These people are bitter and disgruntled by what they see as the betrayal of the West in refusing to guarantee an independent Kosovo and the failure of the current Kosovar leadership to integrate them economically into the emerging polity there. Their motives are part emotional and part pecuniary. Another third is made of unemployed, young Albanians, mainly from Macedonia itself. Their fighting is self-interested. They get a monthly salary and perks and, lacking education and skills, they don't have much of a choice outside the killing fields. The rest are diehard, hardcore, idealists who either fervently espouse a Great Albania, or would like to take over Western Macedonian in a "constitutional coup" which will grant them their own police force, municipalities, institutions, universities, budgets, and semi-political structures. The NLA itself is not directly involved in criminal activities, though a few of its members are. But the money that finances it (from the Czech Republic, Switzerland, Germany, and the USA) is tainted by drug dealing, white slavery, illegal immigration, and the smuggling of everything illicit, from cigarettes to stolen cars, to weapons. In this they collaborate with politicians and criminals in Macedonia - both Albanian and Macedonian. Lobby groups, such as the one you mentioned, are not known to be involved in crime, though.

Q: A couple months ago, Albanian terrorists threatened that the northern Greek province of Epiros would be their next target. Should this threat be taken seriously? And if so, do you foresee attempts by Albanian terrorists to disrupt the Athens Olympics of 2004?

A: I think that Montenegro is next in line, followed by Greece. Both have restless Albanian minorities. Albanian terrorists, in both Kosovo and Macedonia, have hitherto never acted in the manner of Palestinian terrorists (hijacking planes, disrupting international events, etc.). They clung to their "constituencies", recruited from the rural population, obtained logistical supplies (food, medicines) from the hinterland via short supply lines and attacked, largely, only the military and the police.

Q: In 1999, could you have been able to predict that this current crisis in Macedonia would be taking place now?

A: I have. In many of my articles. Visit my web site.

Q: Looking five years in the future, what will become of Macedonia? Will there be a "Greater Albania", and will other Balkans countries' borders be redrawn?

A: Look five years into the past and you will see that Balkan borders HAVE been redrawn. Kosovo has been separated from Serbia. Bosnia is divided to three. The border between Slovenia and Croatia has changed. The only long term permanent and stable solution to the Eastern Question involves changing borders and exchanging populations. The great tragedy of the Balkan is the ignorant and self-interested involvement of the Western Big Powers and their agents, the multilateral organizations (such as the IMF) and the NGO's. But then, Big Powers involvement has always been the Balkan's misfortune.

[url]http://samvak.tripod.com/nm100.html[/url]

Soldier of Macedon 04-15-2011 09:51 PM

[QUOTE=Droog;96005]@julie, Niko: What is so disturbing about the Albanian [B]minority[/B] getting [B]one[/B] of the [B]three[/B] diaspora seats? Both ethnic Macedonians and ethnic Albanians are Macedonian citizens and this arrangement is quite proportionate.[/QUOTE]
Why does it need to be in accordance with proportions? Do you think Albanians should automatically qualify for anything of such a fundamental nature just because their numbers are higher than other minorities? I don't. This should come down to people who have Macedonia's best interests at heart, who consider matters of Macedonian national importance as a priority. Their ethnicity shouldn't come into the picture, and this parallel 'state' and the automatic 'rights' that Albanians seek are divisive and will be the cause of further tension.

Can you find a single member of the ethnic Albanian minority in or out of Macedonia that is for the preservation of Macedonia as it should be, with one official language and culture (like how it is in Albania)? I hope so, but I doubt it. It's the same usual story of double-standards. They were granted unfair privileges because NATO came in to save the terrorists in Arachinovo - and now all think that this is 'normal' and should be a given.

Niko777 04-17-2011 04:26 PM

[B][COLOR="Red"][U]"albeu .com" - FALSE NEWS AGENCY - ALBANIAN ANTI-MACEDONIAN PROPAGANDA[/U][/COLOR][/B]

[B]A recent article from the so called news agency "Albeu" confirms that its news articles are not trustworthy:[/B]

[QUOTE] Macedonians do not want the inscriptions in Albanian

17.04.2011, ora 21:28


Municipal and central institutions, shops, cafes and various shops in Skopje and other cities continue to disregard the inscriptions in Albanian.

Macedonian media report that access tables and their indexes are still only in the Macedonian language and Cyrillic alphabet, and on various occasions, used a third language, and ignored the Albanian language.

in the entire length of the route Skopje - Pristina, the highway Skopje - Tetovo, Skopje - Kumanovo etc., all posts are written in Macedonian.

Albania respects the language of a small group of Macedonians in some settlements where they live, while about 30 percent of Albanians in Macedonia are deprived of this right. / albeu.com /[/QUOTE]

[B]The article claims:
-Albanians in Macedonia are deprived of rights
-Albanians in Macedonia are 30%
-Albanian signs do not exist in Macedonia
-Macedonians in Albania have more rights then Albanians in Macedonia[/B]

Soldier of Macedon 04-18-2011 12:20 AM

Niko777, what is your opinion on the below? Is it on par with what the FA provides for the ethnic Albanians in Macedonia?

[url]http://macedoniaonline.eu/content/view/17968/2/[/url]
[QUOTE]Boards and road signs into Macedonian language have been mounted in the municipality of Pustec.

Names of populated places and institutions written into Albanian language are now written into Macedonian language as well.

A total of [B]nine road signs, boards for hospitals, health home, two schools, 56 street boards and boards for 11 squares[/B], donated by the municipality of Gazi Baba, have been mounted in the municipality of Pustec.

This move is of great importance for ethnic Macedonians in the municipalities of Pustec, deputy mayor Vezil Sterjovski told media.

[B]Streets, squares and institutions[/B] carry the names of prominent figures of Macedonian history as well as significant figures from the history of the Macedonian community in Albania. The names have been approved by the authorities of the municipality of Pustec with the permit by the authorities of the Korca prefecture.[/QUOTE]

Droog 04-18-2011 04:46 AM

[QUOTE=Soldier of Macedon;96099]Why does it need to be in accordance with proportions? Do you think Albanians should automatically qualify for anything of such a fundamental nature just because their numbers are higher than other minorities? I don't. This should come down to people who have Macedonia's best interests at heart, who consider matters of Macedonian national importance as a priority. Their ethnicity shouldn't come into the picture, and this parallel 'state' and the automatic 'rights' that Albanians seek are divisive and will be the cause of further tension.

Can you find a single member of the ethnic Albanian minority in or out of Macedonia that is for the preservation of Macedonia as it should be, with one official language and culture (like how it is in Albania)? I hope so, but I doubt it. It's the same usual story of double-standards. They were granted unfair privileges because NATO came in to save the terrorists in Arachinovo - and now all think that this is 'normal' and should be a given.[/QUOTE]

It is according to proportions in order to maintain the same ethnic balance that exists in the country itself. If it was a simple electoral law, then Albanian emigrants of Switzerland and Germany would probably vote in greater numbers than the Macedonian ones and I'm sure that if that happened many people in Macedonia would consider it an electoral manipulation. As I said before the law exists only to preserve the demographic status in electoral issues. No country has just one language(de facto) and I don't think that I'll find any member of any minority anywhere that doesn't want more rights for his group. That can't and won't change as long as countries are based on ethnic and not civil nationalism. Albania has a one official language in areas where Albanians form the vast majority but in areas that have significant minorities their languages are official too.

Niko777 04-18-2011 06:04 PM

[QUOTE]Niko777, what is your opinion on the below? Is it on par with what the FA provides for the ethnic Albanians in Macedonia?[/QUOTE]
SoM, as I told Prolet in a previous post, I accept this as good news, it is a start, but we cannot compare it with the situation in Macedonia. Pustec is an isolated rural region, whereas in Macedonia, there are Albanian signs in the capital, in front of key government buildings and on main city boulevards. In Macedonia, all Albanian signs were funded by the Macedonian government. The Albanian government did not fund these Macedonian signs in Pustec, they had to by donated by Macedonia. So are we on par? Not by a long shot...

Vangelovski 04-18-2011 06:27 PM

[quote=Niko777;96322]SoM, as I told Prolet in a previous post, I accept this as good news, it is a start, but we cannot compare it with the situation in Macedonia. Pustec is an isolated rural region, whereas in Macedonia, there are Albanian signs in the capital, in front of key government buildings and on main city boulevards. In Macedonia, all Albanian signs were funded by the Macedonian government. The Albanian government did not fund these Macedonian signs in Pustec, they had to by donated by Macedonia. So are we on par? Not by a long shot...[/quote]In addition, Albanians in Macedonian have been given real political power through constitutional amendments and statutory law (yes, the FA again :)). Nothing of that calibre in Albania.

Niko777 04-19-2011 01:36 PM

[B]Can someone please explain to me how Albanians are so successful in building mosques illegally in Skopje? Here, they managed to build a mosque in Karposh Municipality, where they only make up [U]3% of the population[/U]!!![/B]

[IMG]http://img853.imageshack.us/img853/9978/ssszm.jpg[/IMG]

fyrOM 04-19-2011 02:02 PM

[QUOTE][B]France to Make Waving a Foreign Flag Illegal[/B]

[url]http://macedoniaonline.eu/content/view/17980/48/[/url]

Sunday, 17 April 2011

Waving or displaying foreign flags in France could become an offence if an amendment is passed by MPs.
A bill originally targeting the waving or display of non-French flags at mairies in France, particularly at weddings, has had an amendment added to make it an offence to wave such flags in public.

The new amendment, proposed on March 30, by MP Guy Teissier would "regulate the use of foreign flags in French public spaces by demanding prior permission".

According to news site rue89.com Mr Teissier said: "A certain number of people, be they French, foreigners or not, during a diverse range of occasions national holidays, protests or in their daily lives, wave the flags of their country of origin."

He added this was "provocation against the principles of the French republic".

If the amendment is voted through, waving a foreign flag in public without prior permission could be punishable by a fine of up to 1,500.
[/QUOTE]

What's good for the goose is good for the gander?

Maybe Macedonia can learn a lesson here and use it as a precedent?

Voltron 04-19-2011 02:33 PM

[QUOTE=Niko777;96381][B]Can someone please explain to me how Albanians are so successful in building mosques illegally in Skopje? Here, they managed to build a mosque in Karposh Municipality, where they only make up [U]3% of the population[/U]!!![/B]

[IMG]http://img853.imageshack.us/img853/9978/ssszm.jpg[/IMG][/QUOTE]

Told you basements arent a bad idea.


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