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Old 05-14-2022, 09:14 PM   #1014
Carlin
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Constantine Buhayer (University of Westminster, London) states that "many of the Greeks of Crimea were Ellinovlachi".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Onur View Post
The so-called Crimean Greeks were native Turkish speakers with Tatar dialect, all of them without any exception. Already, when they came to Greece, they didn't know a word of Greek.

Their origin is quite clear. We even have books of the western European travelers from 1390 AD which notes the existence of christian Tatars in Crimea, converted by both Byzantine orthodox and western catholic missionaries.

Crimea has been inhabited by Goths [`till 17th century], Turks [`till 20th century] and slavic speaking Ruthenians [to become Ukrainians laters]. I don't think there was any Greeks or Vlachs in there throughout history.
Vyron Karidis, The Mariupol Greeks: Tsarist Treatment of an ethnic minority ca. 1778-1859 - Pages 66 & 67:

- "By the late 1770s the Russians, probably in an attempt to weaken the theoretically independent Crimean Khanate, encouraged a great part of its non-Muslim population (Christian Armenians, Georgians, Vlachs and Crimean Greeks) to emigrate to the steppes of Azov."

- "The exodus started in July 1778. To Alexander Suvorov's report, who played a leading part in the Christian emigration, 'Greeks, Georgians and Vlachs,' left from 68 various parts of the Crimean peninsula..."


PS:
https://www.macedoniantruth.org/foru...5&postcount=90

Last edited by Carlin; 05-14-2022 at 09:30 PM.
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