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Old 09-23-2021, 01:53 AM   #5
Soldier of Macedon
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A state that never existed, fabricated genealogies, dubious baptisms, and an urge to bridge the gaps of reality with fiction. That is what one may expect to find when breaking down the modern Bulgar (“Bulgarian”) narrative about the early Bulgars. The case of the imaginary Bulgar “state” in Macedonia is an outstanding example of lunacy. There is no documented record to prove it existed. Not even a hint. Nor is it certain where Kuber and the Sermesians settled (or for how long). The Miracles of Saint Demetrius, which is the only source that mentions Kuber, appears to point to a location near Salonika. Yet, modern Bulgar historians like Vasil Zlatarski, who is largely responsible for the fabricated Kubrat-Kuber affiliation and the lie about a Bulgar “state” in Macedonia, prefer Bitola as the candidate because they think it strengthens their claim to the Macedonian heartland. To be fair, they aren’t the only ones to have put forth such groundless assertions. Ivan Mikulčić, a Croatian archaeologist who moved to Macedonia during Yugoslav times, claimed that Kuber went to Prilep and then settled in southeast Albania. He bases this on findings that are dated to the 7th and 8th centuries, claiming those in Prilep “probably” belonged to the Kutrigurs and those in southeast Albania were treasures that Kuber captured from the Avars. The Kutrigurs, like the Bulgars, were a Turkic horde that also invaded southeast Europe, ergo, they must have been Kuber’s people. A great story, except the Miracles of Saint Demetrius mentions neither Avar treasures nor Kutrigurs in relation to Kuber’s activities in Macedonia. The work that Mikulčić has done in the field of archaeology may be commendable, but his attempt to tie such findings to certain historical events is intellectually lazy and relies on the opinion of others such as Joachim Werner, the German archaeologist who associated Kubrat with the Pereshchepina treasure in Ukraine.

I am not particularly concerned by the possibility that some early Bulgars may have had a presence in Macedonia at some point (although which groups and their precise locations are questionable, as outlined above), as their Turkic kinsmen raided across much of southeast Europe at various stages and everywhere, bar Moesia, they melted away into irrelevance. What bothers me is how this one particular group that disappeared into obscurity is afforded a disproportionate amount of devotion, all because some people who present themselves as objective scholars have decided to place contemporary irredentism ahead of historical reality. I spent a considerable amount of time reading through primary accounts and secondary sources. The former didn't contain a single piece of evidence to support the existence of a separate Bulgar “state” in Macedonia. The latter offered a staggering magnitude of conjecture. I would challenge anybody with an interest in the topic that has read the initial write-up on this thread to conduct their own research and determine if it is possible to characterise this charade about Kuber as anything other than an absurd lie.
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