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Old 12-18-2010, 10:17 PM   #2
Soldier of Macedon
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The school of thought which promoted a commonality between Thracian and Illyrian languages is still prevalent among some, for example:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thraco-Illyrian
Quote:
Sorin Paliga (2002) - "According to the available data, we may surmise that Thracian and Illyrian were mutually understandable, e.g. like Czech and Slovak, in one extreme, or like Spanish and Portuguese, at the other."
Quote:
Others such as I. I. Russu argue that there should have been major similarities between Illyrian and Thracian, and a common linguistic branch (not merely a Sprachbund) is probable.
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Not much has been determined in the study of Paeonian, and some linguists do not recognize a Paeonian area separate from Illyrian or Thracian. The place of Ancient Macedonian is also undetermined. Paliga (2002) states: "It is therefore difficult to say whether the ancient Macedonians spoke an idiom closer to Thracian, Illyrian, Greek or a specific idiom."
This is just to demonstrate that the idea of a common Paleo-Balkan language family is not a new phenomenon. The lack of further and adequate investigation on this possible commonality on the part of Western scholars led them to search for other theories without having concluded this one. A compilation of surviving words from all Paleo-Balkan languages would then prove to be valuable if one considers a common ancestor for all of them.

One of the difficulties when comparing them to others is due to lacking sentences or paragraphs in the Paleo-Balkan languages. This leaves open a number of possibilities. Are the words we have at our disposal today mere Greek or Latin interpretations? Did Paleo-Balkan languages borrow grammar in addition to vocabulary from their neighbours? Are the case endings and suffixes authentic or loans? Another factor to consider is that PIE languages did not have definite articles, but rather, relied heavily on the following case endings; nominative, accusative, dative, ablative, genitive, vocative, locative and instrumental.
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