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Old 12-19-2010, 06:10 AM   #6
Soldier of Macedon
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Here is a little expirement I have tried in the past and thought worthy of trying again. Basically, I will write a sentence in English, translate it in Macedonian, and then highlight the Thracian connection. Were this to have included the Baltic languages to supplement Macedonian it woud be an even larger sentence.

Son, in the mud there is a beast, a white or golden dragon, quickly to the ford child!

In mod. Macedonian, and directly below highlighted in red, Thracian correspondences in the same sentence:

Sinko, vo kalta ima dzver, bel ili zlaten zmej, brzo na brodot chedo!
Suku, vo chala ima zveri, bal ili salta zum, bruza ana burd kentha!

The Thracian words can be found here: http://indoeuro.bizland.com/project/glossary/thra.html

I have removed the suffixes ending in -s from the Thracian words for simplification. Of course, this alone does not prove that the Thracians even said it the way it is written above due to our lack of knowledge concerning grammar, syntax, etc. Nevertheless, it is an interesting comparison as it demonstrates how closely some Thracian words resemble Macedonian and other Slavic languages. With regard to the word for 'ford' in English, I wrote 'brod' because, although it developed a meaning which came to mean 'boat' in Macedonian, its older meaning was 'ford', as indicated below:
Quote:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_(crossing)

Similarly, in Slavic languages, word brod comes from the linguistic root that means "river-crossing" or "place where river can be crossed". Although today "brod" in Croatian language literally means "ship", Slavonski Brod in Croatia, as well as Makedonski Brod in Macedonia and other place names containing "Brod" in Slavic countries are named after fords.
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