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Old 03-01-2009, 07:19 AM   #151
makedonin
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Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
Anybody else heard of it?
As you put it in the sentence, I would use it similarly, like:

Ne se opinjaj sea..... meaning don't make theatre about certain thing, don't make tensed situation.

I think it is version of "Napinja" > to make something tight, or tensed.
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Old 03-01-2009, 07:21 AM   #152
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Originally Posted by makedonin View Post
That is one way to I would use the word.

Other way, is "Choek ne mozhe da ti Uidisa nisho" meaning

No one can't make it right to you
We say:
Kak te udisa = whatever suits you
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Old 03-01-2009, 07:23 AM   #153
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Originally Posted by Risto the Great View Post
We say:
Kak te udisa = whatever suits you
you can put it that way too.

Anybody ever heard "Sardisa" ?

See last post here
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Old 03-01-2009, 08:05 AM   #154
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I have heard of Sardisa many times, it was prevalent during the Ottoman era hence the reason why some believe it is Turkish. For example, in the film "Ilinden", in reference to the Turkish attack on Krushevo, one person says, "go sardisa gradot" - they surrounded the city.

The fact that your search on this word has not given a conclusive Turkish etymology is interesting to say the least. I am not sure if we have stumbled on a similar set of suffixes on some Macedonian words, but check this out:

Bendisa
Kandisa
Sardisa
Udisa


What do you make of it?
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Old 03-01-2009, 08:07 AM   #155
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Slovak, what do you think mate?
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Old 03-01-2009, 09:30 AM   #156
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Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
My thoughts exactly. Used in one song in Thrace compared to being understood in nearly all Macedonia seems a no-brainer. It may have been a Thracian word by origin given its similarity to Bendisa, but it is now a unique Macedonian word, being present in a song or two does not exactly qualify it as a Bulgarian word.
First,I would like to apologise if my above statement have offended anyone interested in this subject or shifted the subject.I did not know/have overlooked 'Bendisa'.I will read earlier posts more carefully before posting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
Tribunal, whereabouts in Thrace is the song from? You seem to be familiar with Bulgarian literature then, Bugarin si?
I couldn't specify the region in Thrace.
No,I am not Bulgarian.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
Tribunal, would the word 'kutre' be used for anything else in Bulgarian?
As far as I know,when Bulgarians say 'kutre' it usually means 'little finger'.I have no idea how and why this word is used.'Kutre' as 'puppy' is extremely rare from my experience.
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Old 03-01-2009, 12:16 PM   #157
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post

Bendisa
Kandisa
Sardisa
Udisa


What do you make of it?
I can't tell exactly, but it can be archaic form

For example, I would say: "sredi se", as a statement for "I have accomodated my self" or "I have put everything in order".

What I am going at is that this word , the "sred" > in order and "i" as ending and the particle "se" can be put in one word:

sredise...... where the "e" on the end is arhaic "a".

Or take the word: "sherbetisa" composed of "sherbet">sugar like water and ending "i" and particle "sa"

which all put in one word would describe the process of some liquid or some substance becoming like sugar-water.

The particle "se" and archaic "sa" are acctually forms of the modern particle so > wich describes relation of something and means "with" or sometimes "alike" when put in the end. Sometimes the particle "se" also is used for "all" .

I don't have to mention that the character "T" and character "D" interchange very often in our Language, which would make the word sherbetisa also possible as sherbedisa in some dialects.


So those words could be of this composition:

Bend i sa
Kand i sa
Sard i sa
Ud i sa

where "I" is the feminine or Plural ending, and "sa" is the variaton of particle "so" on the end.

what do you think SoM ?
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Old 03-01-2009, 01:11 PM   #158
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I have always used kutale for puppy. A variation of kutre, I would imagine.

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Old 03-02-2009, 07:24 AM   #159
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Quote:
Originally Posted by makedonin View Post
I can't tell exactly, but it can be archaic form

For example, I would say: "sredi se", as a statement for "I have accomodated my self" or "I have put everything in order".

What I am going at is that this word , the "sred" > in order and "i" as ending and the particle "se" can be put in one word:

sredise...... where the "e" on the end is arhaic "a".

Or take the word: "sherbetisa" composed of "sherbet">sugar like water and ending "i" and particle "sa"

which all put in one word would describe the process of some liquid or some substance becoming like sugar-water.

The particle "se" and archaic "sa" are acctually forms of the modern particle so > wich describes relation of something and means "with" or sometimes "alike" when put in the end. Sometimes the particle "se" also is used for "all" .

I don't have to mention that the character "T" and character "D" interchange very often in our Language, which would make the word sherbetisa also possible as sherbedisa in some dialects.


So those words could be of this composition:

Bend i sa
Kand i sa
Sard i sa
Ud i sa

where "I" is the feminine or Plural ending, and "sa" is the variaton of particle "so" on the end.

what do you think SoM ?
Interesting interpretation Makedonin, but I think that the suffix would be more than just the 'sa' as all of the words have an 'i' infront, making it seem as one complete word rather than a combination of two or more. But then again, I could be wrong. I was actually looking at it as an archaic type suffix - "(d)isa" - that has lingered in an older set of words.

I am going to continue this discussion in the following thread as it will be more relevant there:

http://www.macedoniantruth.org/forum...2836#post12836
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Old 03-02-2009, 07:47 AM   #160
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tribunal
First,I would like to apologise if my above statement have offended anyone interested in this subject or shifted the subject.I did not know/have overlooked 'Bendisa'.I will read earlier posts more carefully before posting.
You haven't offended anybody Tribunal, so no need for apologies. What do you make of these words, how do you think they appeared in the Macedonian tongue?
Quote:
I couldn't specify the region in Thrace.
Do you have the words to the song you mentioned, Dan'ova Mama?
Quote:
No,I am not Bulgarian.
Given that you seem to be aware of this remote and rare song in Thrace, you obviously have some sort of connection to the Balkans. I am Macedonian from both sides, origins in the villages of Bitola. How about you, what is your background?
Quote:
As far as I know,when Bulgarians say 'kutre' it usually means 'little finger'.I have no idea how and why this word is used.'Kutre' as 'puppy' is extremely rare from my experience.
What is your experience, have you studied or lived there?
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