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Old 07-17-2009, 04:19 AM   #181
makedonin
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I know both kamen and karpa. Although for me they differ in the size.

Kamen is mostly what you can put in a hand or lift it with both.

Karpa is used for Rocks that are big and cant be moved by one man.

Karpa is used instead of saying Big Stone > Golem Kamen > Rock


Kamen > stone
Karpa > rock
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Old 07-17-2009, 01:02 PM   #182
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Agree Makedonin.

I just checked a standard Albanian-English dictionary (Ramazan Hysa, Hippocrene Books, New York, 2003) that has over 23,000 entries and is based on the accepted use of the language in Albania and Kosovo. There is no sign of the word 'Karpa' anywhere.

On the other hand, check the below item from a Thracian glossary:
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http://www.wordgumbo.com/ie/cmp/thra.htm
.........kapas ‘hill, slope’ [Latv. kapa, kape ‘long mountain strip, dune, slope’, Lith. kopa ‘and hill, dune’].
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Old 01-24-2010, 01:00 AM   #183
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Several Thracian placenames have the suffix of 'para', such as Beripara, Tranupara, Bazopara, Bisupara, etc, which is assumed to indicate a 'town' or 'village'.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thracian_language 
-- para, pera, peron -- "town" -- Old Prussian pera "group" peroni "parish, community" --
Given the relation shared between Thracian and Balto-Slavic on the one hand, and Balto-Slavic with Sanskrit on the other, it is more than likely that 'para' is a cognate word for Sanskrit 'puram' which means 'city' or 'fortress', as in the name of Singapore (Lions City);
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore 
The English language name Singapore comes from Malay Singapura, "Lion-city", but it is possible that one element of its name had a more distant original source.[20] Pura comes from Sanskrit puram (पुरम्), "city, fortress", and is related to Greek polis (πόλις), "citadel, city".
I think inspecting the similarities with Sanskrit might prove to be a very worthwhile exercise.
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Old 02-14-2010, 12:37 PM   #184
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dont know if you already mentioned it

RMBA = Raboti, rabota

i think it can be added to the Unique Macedonian Words without problem

even the vulgarians dont have it (forgot to steal it )

Last edited by Serdarot; 02-14-2010 at 01:38 PM.
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Old 02-14-2010, 12:39 PM   #185
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Quote:
Originally Posted by makedonin View Post
I know both kamen and karpa. Although for me they differ in the size.

Kamen is mostly what you can put in a hand or lift it with both.

Karpa is used for Rocks that are big and cant be moved by one man.

Karpa is used instead of saying Big Stone > Golem Kamen > Rock


Kamen > stone
Karpa > rock
a spila?
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Old 02-14-2010, 04:33 PM   #186
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serdarot View Post
dont know if you already mentioned it

RMBA = Raboti, rabota

i think it can be added to the Unique Macedonian Words without problem

even the vulgarians dont have it (forgot to steal it )
My favorite is AKA. Not bulgarian AKA with it's vulgar meaning, but macedonian AKA.
Many peoples think that the word AKTIVEN, AKTIVNOST are derived from ACTION. When we check for the etymology of word action we will see it origins from latin "actio". Probably that's the truth how this words have arrived to us. Or half of the truth.
Another half I think we should seek in this old original form preserved in our macedonian language. AKA in everyday speech means "to do" or "to go" (one of the most important activities in ancient times), same like the latin word.
So maybe the principle of "action-reaction" now means more "macedonian" to you . If not, then we should explain the second part, namely "reaction" that we find in macedonian language under the form VRAKJA (враќа) which means movement in opposite of going to. It consists of the preposition V + REAKA.
I don't know if this is word from ancient balkan languages or remnant from the times of roman slavery but certainly there is more logics to think that it's here before the times of famous "migration".
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Old 02-14-2010, 05:21 PM   #187
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kaj bese be sinko, kaj akashe? (kaj shetase)

kaj ke odis? - eve ke odam da akam (da rabotam, da rŽbam)


Mitreeeeeee

a?

aknal ta puknal (aknal - akni = udri, tresni)

more ke mu go donesam jas nemu AKot (AKalot, AŽkŽlo)

a na vulgarite ko ke mu ja aknam edna... poso nemat akal

a jas, demek bagji nashki dijalekti znaeh da lafam, ke treba pokje da ve druzam na vaa tema

Last edited by Serdarot; 02-14-2010 at 05:37 PM.
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Old 05-30-2015, 10:06 AM   #188
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I saw on palaeolexicon.com that one Thracian word for mountain was "carpatis." Really interesting how similar it is to the name Carpathian (mountains). Perhaps it has a Thracian etymology.
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Old 06-02-2015, 03:25 PM   #189
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
How about the words KANDISA and BENDISA, does anybody else here use them, and if so, what do they mean to you?

The word Bendisa is close Bendis, the name of an ancient Thracian goddess of the moon. The ancient Greeks identified her with Artemis.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bendis



Thracians and Phrygians = Macedonians.
Here's what I found on Wikipedia about Bendis:

Quote:
Bendis was a Thracian goddess of the moon and the hunt[1] whom the Greeks identified with Artemis. She was a huntress, like Artemis
I believe that in some Baltic language (presently, I cannot confirm which one) the term "bendi" exists meaning "to butcher." I think this is a closer fit for Bendis, as she was the goddess of the hunt.
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Old 06-02-2015, 03:30 PM   #190
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
Shtipka is a peg in my dialect, like when you hang your clothes up.

Aren and Arno are used extensively by all people from Bitola, and I am sure among most other Macedonians. Jabolko or Jaboko (depending on the context and laziness, lol), Sega or Sea (depending on the context), Kukja only in my neck of the woods.

I have said it before and I will say it again, the Kostur dialect is one of the most interesting and archaic-sounding of all Macedonian dialects.
Arno, aren = good, well

Here's something interesting though: Homer used the word "Άρειον ('Areion)" to mean things like "Better, worthier, stronger, in better condition, good." Maybe there's something there?
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