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Old 03-02-2009, 10:05 AM   #161
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In Lithuanian a 'Kunigaikshtis' is a Duke, which looks close to Knez, in Ukranian Knyaz is a Prince, as in some other Slavic languages.

How about the word 'Herceg', I have always assumed it is a Magyar word loaned to the Slavic-speakers of Illyria, but the word for Duke in Lithuanian is 'Hercogas' and in Russian it is 'Gertsog'

.

Are these two words (Knez and Herceg) Magyar loans?

Slovak, some assistance mate?
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Old 03-08-2009, 09:25 AM   #162
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Here are some ancient placenames that were (some no longer) retained in slightly altered forms, in and around Macedonia:

SKUPI – SKOPIE

DEBORUS – DEBAR

SARDIKA – SREDITSA

ASTIBO – SHTIP

BEROA - BER



If anybody knows of other similar example, share them here.
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Old 03-08-2009, 10:42 AM   #163
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
Are these two words (Knez and Herceg) Magyar loans?

Slovak, some assistance mate?
Knez is an old IE word from which also the English king, German könig, generally from Proto-Germanic kuningaz, Latvian ķēniņš, Persian kian, etc.
The word herceg is borrowed from German Herzog meaning "duke". It comes from 'Heer zog' ('army'+'lead').
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But for broad minded people, (whole) earth is (like their) family.
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Old 05-25-2009, 04:20 AM   #164
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Something about the Acheron in Epirus.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acheron

Quote:
The lake called Acherousia and the river still called Acheron with the nearby ruins of the Necromanteion are found near Parga on the mainland opposite Corfu.

The Acheron was sometimes referred to as a lake or swamp in Greek literature, as in Aristophanes' The Frogs and Euripides' Alcestis.
In Macedonian the word for lake is 'Ezero', obviously still close to the Slavonic and Illyrian variants. In Greek the word for lake is Limni (λίμνη), likely to be unrelated to the following set of words.

Acheron
Oseriates (Lake, Illyrian)
Ozero (Lake, Slavonic)

A Centem -> Satem example? Slovak (and others), give us your thoughts.
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Old 06-07-2009, 08:58 AM   #165
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I’ll take a shot at it.

The ‘ah-k’ and ‘oh-z’ articulations are mechanically similar, as with ‘oh-n’ and ‘oh’. ‘ah’ is a relaxation of ‘oh’ and the ‘k’ sound is what naturally occurs if the pressure required for producing ‘oh’ is reduced to the level of ‘ah’ and the transition to the deflection of the tongue off the top part of the mouth is sped up and the tongue is allowed to glance off the roof of the mouth more forcefully due to the fact that less energy is needed to produce the initial segment of the combination, creating more surface contact to finish off the transition from ‘ah’ to ‘k’. The pronunciation of ‘oak’ will yield an intermediary position for the ‘k’ articulation that demonstrates its similarity to ‘z’ that’s not evident when simply listening to both sounds or looking at both symbolic combinations.

The Esera river that flows from a lake in the Ribagorza (riba gora) region of Aragon, Spain represents a transformation of ‘oh’ into ‘eh’. ‘eh’, of course, is ‘oh’ drawn in a bit, instead of being forced out. Speeding up the production of ozero would produce this transformation. They say the fishing has been quite good there since the early Neolithic Period. The similarity between Aragon and Acheron is either a complete coincidence or something that needs to be researched further.

Are there any more toponyms from the specific region where Acheron is found that either reflect or appear to reflect pre-existing linguistic characteristics that can be independently supported in other regions of Europe? Are there other creole transformations that reflect similar paths of change that can be used to substantiate the relevance of these observations?
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Old 06-08-2009, 04:08 PM   #166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
In Macedonian the word for lake is 'Ezero', obviously still close to the Slavonic and Illyrian variants. In Greek the word for lake is Limni (λίμνη), likely to be unrelated to the following set of words.

Acheron

A Centem -> Satem example? Slovak (and others), give us your thoughts.
This Acheron just too much reminds me and obviously is connected with Ohrid....
Maybe finnaly this is the right explanation of etimology for the name of this macedonian city..
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Old 06-09-2009, 01:20 AM   #167
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Here is something very relevent to this topic. (I posted this point on another forum).

Here is what Victor Friedman had to say about Greek censorship of archeological finds of ancient Thracian origin, which are sitting in the archives of Greece under lock and guard.


Quote:
They did. The inscriptions are in Greek script, but the words are Thracian. And the inscriptions are sitting in Greece, gathering dust. They know they’re there, but no one’s going to work on them because the language is not Greek. So they’re not going to let anyone see them. I have this from a colleague of mine who is a classicist and interested in the
subject.

Source: http://www.maknews.com/html/articles/st ... st_42.html
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Old 06-11-2009, 07:42 PM   #168
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Thanks for that Pelister, it would be great if those thieving bastards reveal what has been found in the modern Greek state. What are they hiding? Why are they hiding it? Macedonia DOES NOT hide their archaeological finds, regardless of what language the inscription is in, but these measly monkeys in the Greek state who proclaim to be scholars, desperately cling to their lock and key, idiots. May some decent Greek finally come to the forefront and expose the colour of Greek history.
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Old 06-12-2009, 05:18 AM   #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soldier of Macedon View Post
Thanks for that Pelister, it would be great if those thieving bastards reveal what has been found in the modern Greek state. What are they hiding? Why are they hiding it? Macedonia DOES NOT hide their archaeological finds, regardless of what language the inscription is in, but these measly monkeys in the Greek state who proclaim to be scholars, desperately cling to their lock and key, idiots. May some decent Greek finally come to the forefront and expose the colour of Greek history.
I am getting it from a number of sources now that the Greeks are hiding what they have or that Western historians are not allowed access to them.

If it was just one person saying it, it probably wouldn't be believed but this is just another person giving evidence that the Greeks are hiding something.

Honestly SoM, if I had the money I would pay a Greek historian to research them, or at least persuade him to try, or perhaps a Western historian to try again.
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Old 06-13-2009, 12:34 AM   #170
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Here is a part of the following Indopedia (similar to Wiki) article concerning the Balkan Linguistic Union.

http://www.indopedia.org/Balkan_linguistic_union.html
Quote:
Latin "mesa" → Romanian: "masă" → Bulgarian/Macedonian: "маса" ("masa") meaning table
Thracian or Illyrian → Albanian: "magar" ↔ Romanian "măgar" ↔ Bulgarian "магаре" ("magare") meaning donkey
Slavic → Bulgarian: ливада ("livada") → Albanian: "livadhe" ↔ Romanian "livadă" ↔ Greek: "λιβάδι" meaning meadow
Livada is a Macedonian word which the Bulgars adopted some time during or after their abandonment of Turkic and adoption of Slavonic as the official language of their people. Another word that is shared by Macedonians and Bulgars is Sugare (сугаре), which is supposed to mean the youngest of a sheep flock, and hence also used as a nickname for the youngest member of a family (at least in Macedonian). As a word in reference to a farm animal, it is likely to be related to the word for donkey, Magare (магаре), a Thraco-Illyrian word. I can't find anything on google that shows Albanians and Romanians using Sugare (сугаре), so how could Magare (магаре) be their word? Hard to believe, unless of course it can be demonstrated that they do use the word.
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